The Woodchip Handbook is both a comprehensive and unique look at the agricultural and horticultural uses and importance of woodchip: for farmers, gardeners, and landscapers.

 

I introduce readers to both scientific and farmer-based research into the myriad uses for woodchip: as a mulch (of course), but also as a propagation material for plant mixes, as a growing medium for many species of mushrooms, and even as a heat source for greenhouse hotbeds.

 

For farmers and landowners, the book offers a lot of information about sourcing woodchip, or producing your own, including traditional techniques like coppicing and pollarding trees, and traditional but almost forgotten skills like “laying a hedge.” Anyone interested in growing crops will enjoy this, from those with garden allotments to those who have moderately large farming operations.

 

With today’s climate concerns, building soil carbon and organic matter with natural materials has become even more important, and composting woodchip (rather than burning woody material) is key to that effort.